Mom Is TERRIFIED When Kids Sunscreen Gives Daughter 2nd Degree BURNS

When consumer products are unsafe, the manufacturer has a legal obligation to disclose this to consumers.


One mother is now demanding answers after her 14-month-old daughter Kyla suffered a serious reaction to a product that gave her no warning about what it might do to her child.

Rebecca Cannon was doing what any responsible mother would do when she tried to protect her daughter from the sun by applying sunscreen. The product she used, Banana Boat Kids SPF50, said that it was “great for kids”, but failed to specify what ages should use it.

After her daughter’s ordeal with the sunscreen, Cannon is now proclaiming that any product that does this to anyone’s skin should not be on the market.

Posted by Rebecca Cannon on Monday, May 8, 2017

From IJ Review:

Over time, after Cannon had applied some of the sunscreen lightly on her daughter’s face, the girl’s skin began to change:

“As the day went on, she got a little redder and redder and the next morning she woke up and was swollen, she was bright red, there were blisters starting to pop up.”

The mother took her daughter, Kyla, to the doctor, where she was told the 14-month-old had second-degree burns.

Posted by Rebecca Cannon on Monday, May 8, 2017

Other consumers have had similar issues with this Banana Boat sunscreen. Three years ago, an 11-month old from Alabama used the same sunscreen as this child and also turned red and blistered.

Many sunscreens contain harmful chemicals that can disrupt hormones and cause allergic reactions in the skin.

A Banana Boat representative has responded to Cannon’s case, stating, We are greatly concerned when any person encounters a reaction using our products. We have spoken with the consumer and asked for the product so that our quality assurance team can look into this further. Without examining the product, it is difficult to determine what may have caused the problem as described.”

For now the toddler’s swelling has gone down thanks to doctors prescribing a steroid and giving the child antihistamines.

The next time Cannon takes her daughter outside, perhaps she should just use a hat.

Source: IJ Review

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