Alert! Health Officials Report 1,300 Cases of Rare Deadly Disease – They Can’t Contain It

While those of us in the United States have been worried about hurricanes, wildfires, and impotent liberal rage, other problems have been brewing around the world.


A health crisis has arisen in the not-so-remote land of Madagascar. Health experts and medical professionals are scrambling to address the issue and contain it.

But the country’s close proximity to Africa and the ease by which people can travel have us teetering on a full blown crisis.

What’s the health issue, you might ask? Oh nothing, just the BLACK DEATH.

From The Sun:

MADAGASCAR’S deadly Black Death outbreak could last another SIX MONTHS – with officials warning the oncoming rainy season could see the epidemic explode.

At least 128 people have been killed and more than 1,300 infected by the deadly pneumonic strain of the medieval disease.

And while health officials have seen a slight dip in victims, they warned it could explode at any point between now and April.

Tarik Jašarević of the World Health Organisation told The Sun: “We cannot say with certainty that the epidemic has subsided.

“We are about three months into the epidemic season, which goes on until April 2018.

“Even if the recent declining trend is confirmed, we cannot rule out the possibility of further spikes in transmission between now and April 2018…

And because the disease can be spread easily through a cough or sneeze, experts are fearful just one traveller could take the infection with them to Africa’s mainland or even nearby Brit honeymoon paradises like Mauritius, the Maldives or the Seychelles.

The Seychelles is currently putting anyone travelling from Madagascar into quarantine on arrival.

The pneumonic plague is a horrible way to die. The aggressive lung infection takes only a few days to kill a victim, some dying within 36 hours. The disease spreads rapidly; people can pass it on by sharing the same air.

In today’s modern world such diseases can spreading faster than you’d expect. Even with modern medicine and improvements in sanitation and waste, the ease by which this plague grows is a huge problem.

One person with the disease can easily get on a plane, infecting everyone else. Then they will spread it to whomever else they come into contact with. Because of Madagascar’s close proximity to major African countries, concerns of an outbreak are very much valid.

The disease is expected to thrive, thanks to the rainy season, during which outbreaks are most active.

While you think you might be safe, being many miles away, this problem can quickly spiral out of control. Health experts are struggling to keep the situation contained. A few countries are issuing quarantines for anyone coming from Madagascar. But will it be enough?

Experts are saying the problem might persist for the next six months.

Be sure to stay tuned for the latest updates. As more news emerges, we will be sure to share it.

Source: The Sun

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